designer shoesSome of the best moments of my life are the times when I receive shoe gifts, the joy of opening the shiny packages, the calculations I make to place the latest at a spot where I would always see them (vanity! :D) and the sweetest of these moments were the D-day, I would stride all day in my highest spirits (singing: my shoes, my everything!).

But what really goes on inside your priceless shoes? Your feet is what majorly goes in there, so how well do you take care of your feet? It’s quite easy to forget about that part of the body in and out of the bath and it’s just recently people are starting to value pedicures (me included). Meanwhile, a lot can happen inside of your pretty pricy shoes that would affect the entire body.

Here’s a list of some of them:
  1. Athletes foot

Athlete's Foot

Athlete’s Foot

This is a fungal infection which causes peeling, redness, itching, burning, and sometimes blisters and sores. It’s mildly contagious, and can be spread by direct contact or by walking barefoot in places like locker rooms or near pools. The fungi then grow in shoes, particularly tight ones without much room for air flow. They can be treated using fungus-fighting lotions, or pills for more severe cases.

  1. Plantar warts

plantar wart

Plantar Wart

These are tough growths formed on the soles of the feet.  They are gotten when a virus penetrates the body through broken skin and can spread via skin-to-skin contact or on surfaces in places like public pools and showers. The harmless, in many cases they’re too painful to ignore. Salicylic acid can be applied to get rid of them as well as burning, freezing, laser therapy, and surgery to remove them in severe cases.

  1. Toe deformities caused by wearing too tight shoes including.

hammer toes

Hammer toes

  • Hammer toes occur when the toe starts to curl up instead of lying flat. Simple treatment options include strapping techniques, wearing shoes with a wider toe box, wearing toe splints, and applying ice to the affected area. If these techniques are not effective, surgery to correct the deformity should be considered.
corn toes

corn toes

  • Corns which are a type of callus that develops when tight shoes put constant pressure on the skin. Simple treatment involves applying a foam pad over the corn to help relieve the pressure. In addition, wearing shoes that fit properly and have a roomy toe area will help.
crossover toe

crossover toe

  • Crossover toes which are formed when the toes are crimped in a toe box that is too small, and the constant pressure causes the second or third toe to move over the toe next to it. Simple treatment consists of wearing shoes with a wider toe box, using spacers or taping to keep the toes apart, and applying ice to the affected area. If this conservative treatment fails, surgery may be an option
ingrown toe nails

ingrown toe nails

  • An ingrown toenail usually occurs in the big toe when the nail is cut short near the tip of the toe. This injury may be aggravated when you put your foot in a shoe that is too tight in the toe box, causing your first toe to be pressed against the second toe, and resulting in abnormal pressure on the nail. The constant pressure causes inflammation and nail pain. Simple treatment involves wearing a shoe with a wider toe box and soaking the toe three to four times a day in warm water. Trim your toenail straight across and avoid trimming the corners of too short.

That would be all for now, until 3 pm on Thursday when we go through proper ways to treat your feet and how to choose the best shoes for your feet. The next time you’re about to slip your feet into one of your designer shoes, ask this simple question: am I slipping designer feet into my precious shoes? 😀 🙂 😉 

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Destiny Dena.
Farmer|Poet|GodLover?

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